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Table 1 Agreement (kappa) between the groups

From: Are physician assistant and patient airway assessments reliable compared to anesthesiologist assessments in detecting difficult airways in general surgical patients?

Item Pat-PA PA-Anes Pat-Anes Pat-PA-Anes
Kappa p Kappa p Kappa p Kappa p
1 .192 <  .001 .202 < .001 .216 < .001 .216 < .001
2 .807 < .001 .681 < .001 .723 < .001 .733 < .001
3 .542 < .001 .509 < .001 .527 < .001 .523 < .001
4 .205 .003 .179 .011 .205 .004 .195 < .001
5 Down .659 < .001 .659 < .001 .590 < .001 .634 < .001
5 Up .486 < .001 .535 < .001 .360 < .001 .456 < .001
5 Tilt .152 .002 .348 < .001 .101 .051 .212 < .001
5 Left .485 < .001 .260 < .001 .260 < .001 .328 < .001
5 Right .534 < .001 .658 < .001 .654 < .001 .619 < .001
  1. Item 1 is Mallampati classification, 2 is “Can you fit three fingers in your mouth when fully opened?,” 3 is “Can you place your lower teeth in front of your upper teeth?,” 4 is “Can you fit three fingers between your chin and your Adam’s apple?,” and 5 is neck motion and position (Fig. 1). P is the probability that kappa differs from zero by chance alone
  2. Pat patient, PA physician assistant, Anes anesthesiologist